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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

EPCF Know Art

Arts & Culture

El Paso Opera presents La Bohème: Two singers talk about their art

EPO celebrates its 20th anniversary with 2013-2014 season

by Cindy Graff Cohen // April 7, 2014

El Paso Opera presents La Bohème: Two singers talk about their art

So here we have two women from very different backgrounds, but both with big dreams and big voices that will stop you in your tracks. Neither came from musical families, but both have parents who support their career choice. Both were natural singers who were called on to sing solos at church and other venues when they were just children. Both received no special voice training until they were in college. Both possess a calm poise and grace and a natural beauty. More...

Rosa Guerrero remembers life after the death of Ruben Salazar

Arts & Culture

Rosa Guerrero remembers life after the death of Ruben Salazar

"I turned on the news, and she was hoping it wasn’t the Ruben Salazar she knew from El Paso. But it was."

by Esmeralda Ojeda // April 4, 2014

"My sister-in-law had called me from Ohio. She used to shine Ruben’s shoes. She said, 'Rosa, I just saw on the news that Ruben Salazar was killed in California.' I turned on the news, and she was hoping it wasn’t the Ruben Salazar she knew from El Paso. But it was. Tom Brokaw came out and said, 'Mexican-American journalist killed in California.'” More...

Poetry: Syrian

Arts & Culture

Poetry: Syrian

by Serenity Garcia // March 7, 2014

A poem by Serenity Garcia. More...

Rosa’s Cantina: Was it really the inspiration for Marty Robbins’ "El Paso"?

Arts & Culture

Rosa’s Cantina: Was it really the inspiration for Marty Robbins’ "El Paso"?

by Mark Cioc-Ortega // January 29, 2014

The “El Paso” legend is now an El Paso “fact.” The notion that Rosa’s Cantina is “the real thing” is so deeply ingrained in popular culture that it’s not likely to be dislodged by something as banal as the truth. More...

Profile: Gaspar Enriquez

Arts & Culture

Profile: Gaspar Enriquez

by Richard Baron // January 15, 2014

When a retrospective of the artworks of 71 year old Gaspar Enriquez opens at the El Paso Museum of Art near the end of the month, it will only be a few short blocks from where he was born and raised, in El Segundo Barrio. More...

Stanley Good and El Paso’s 1915 marihuana ordinance

Arts & Culture

Stanley Good and El Paso’s 1915 marihuana ordinance

by Bob Chessey // January 9, 2014

Years before Harry Anslinger headed the new Federal Bureau of Narcotics in 1930, and decades before the formation of the Drug Enforcement Administration, there was Stanley Good.

Good was chief deputy of the El Paso Sheriff’s Department. He was short in stature and frame, and he wore glasses, so he did not fit the stereotypical image of a West Texas lawman. Yet he set in motion legislation still resonating in El Paso to this day: the 1915 Marihuana Ordinance. More...

Profile:  David Nakabayashi

Arts & Culture

Profile: David Nakabayashi

by Richard Baron // December 14, 2013

"Really, I love El Paso. There's a lot of creative energy here but it's never going to have a big gallery scene because of a lack of buyers. It's not El Paso's fault. You can try, but there's no creating something out of nothing. I wanted an art career where I could make money so I knew I had to split. It wasn't that I wanted to leave El Paso, it's that I wanted to do more with my art." More...

The art of drag

Arts & Culture

The art of drag

Drag scene is part of El Paso's fabric

by Esmeralda Ojeda // December 7, 2013

Men dressing as women isn’t a new phenomenon. Cross-dressing has been practice by many throughout much of history, especially in Shakespearean theatre and early Chinese theatre, where men dressed as women since women were not allowed on stage. More...

The “First Thanksgiving”: Can a little myth reveal a big truth?

Arts & Culture

The “First Thanksgiving”: Can a little myth reveal a big truth?

by Mark Cioc-Ortega // November 27, 2013

San Elizario has been commemorating the “First Thanksgiving” every April since 1989. This celebration is the brainchild of Sheldon Hall, who was then the president of the El Paso Mission Trail Association, and a handful of local historians who wanted to draw attention to an important, but neglected event in American history: the arrival of Juan de Oñate and his entourage of Spanish-speaking explorers and priests in April 1598 near the present-day town of San Elizario.

More...

El Paso’s Creative Kids recognized at White House

Arts & Culture

El Paso’s Creative Kids recognized at White House

by Andrés Rodríguez, Scripps Howard Foundation Wire // November 25, 2013

A UPS “sorry, we missed you” notice was sitting in front of Andrea Gates-Ingle’s art gallery in downtown El Paso one Monday in June when the gallery was closed. When she picked up the letter from the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities, she assumed it was a rejection letter.

But it wasn’t. More...

“Where did you go to high school?”

Arts & Culture

“Where did you go to high school?”

Some say ubiquitous question about finding common ground, others say judging

by Esmeralda Ojeda // November 14, 2013

Where did you go to high school?

Chances are that if you’re from El Paso, you have been asked this ubiquitous question when meeting somebody for the first time.

Why is it that El Pasoans tend to ask it more often than any other question when meeting new people? Is it an ‘El Paso’ thing? More...

Land, Migrants and Poets: The Day of the Dead 2013

Arts & Culture

Land, Migrants and Poets: The Day of the Dead 2013

by Kent Paterson, Frontera NorteSur // October 30, 2013

New Mexico and the borderland will come alive this weekend with activities related to the annual Day of the Dead celebration, which falls on Saturday, November 2, this year. As befits a cultural boom that is drawing in thousands and thousands of people, this year promises bigger and broader events than ever before, encompassing art, music, literature, and culinary treats. More...

Los Chihuahuas de El Chuco

Arts & Culture

Los Chihuahuas de El Chuco

by Lucia Quiñonez // October 25, 2013

For weeks, billboards with a pair of intimidating, red and black eyes stared at El Pasoans, leaving residents to guess the name of its new Triple-A baseball team. More...

Mexican-American Indians now make up the fourth largest tribal group in the United States

Arts & Culture

Mexican-American Indians now make up the fourth largest tribal group in the United States

by Esmeralda Ojeda // October 24, 2013

Mexican-American Indians now make up the fourth largest tribal group in the United States, following the Cherokee, Navajo, and Choctaw, according to the US Census. More...

Texas Tech College of Architecture at El Paso and the El Paso Museum of Art launch 3rd annual lecture series

Arts & Culture

Texas Tech College of Architecture at El Paso and the El Paso Museum of Art launch 3rd annual lecture series

Nine-part series focuses on El Paso as a “City of Choice”

by Lucia Quiñonez // October 4, 2013

On September 26, the Texas Tech College of Architecture at El Paso and the El Paso Museum of Art launched its 3rd annual lecture series. This year’s theme for the nine-part lecture series is City of Choice. The series began with speakers Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt, principle architects of R & R Studios of Miami, known for creating large-scale permanent public installations. More...

Dead Reckoning: Where were El Paso’s earliest cemeteries?

Arts & Culture

Dead Reckoning: Where were El Paso’s earliest cemeteries?

by Mark Cioc-Ortega // September 25, 2013

Concordia Cemetery opened in 1884, Evergreen in 1893. The Smelter Cemetery was established in 1882, but it wasn’t used much before the 1890s. So, where did El Pasoans bury their dead before that? The answer, it seems, is “just about anywhere they wanted to.” Back yards, empty lots, hillsides. The population was small, the desert was vast, and the laws were lax. More...

Time and the Tarahumara

Arts & Culture

Time and the Tarahumara

by Esmeralda Ojeda // September 9, 2013

The place I write of is a haunting, tiny village in the Copper Canyon called Cuiteco. Copper Canyon, in Chihuahua, Mexico, rests at the convergence of six rivers. The town of Cuiteco is off the beaten track, nestled deep in a valley of one of these canyons, and impossible to reach without a 4x4 vehicle. The town is so hidden that not even Google Maps recognizes it. On the way to Cuiteco, the roads are littered with makeshift shrines, marking the places that cars or people fell down to their deaths. And that’s on the “paved” roads. The unpaved roads are even more dangerous. More...

“The Texan” (#41): The best little book on Texas that probably doesn't exist

Arts & Culture

“The Texan” (#41): The best little book on Texas that probably doesn't exist

by Lucius Lomax // August 29, 2013

If you look at the Modern Library’s list of the 100 Best Nonfiction works, number 41 is the absolute best writing about Texas, which is an easy call since none of the other books has the Lone Star State as its subject. Number 41 is appropriately titled "The Texan" by C.S. Barrios. More...

Hixson House to screen monthly film series

Arts & Culture

Hixson House to screen monthly film series

Organizers makes plans for Sunset Film Society

by Andrés Rodríguez, Scripps Howard Foundation Wire // August 14, 2013

The West Yandell house, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is under the care of new-owner Rosa Chavez. Chavez, the former executive director of Centro Mujeres de Esperanza, said she hopes to make the house a space to educate and entertain audiences through film and other upcoming projects. More...

Women’s rights in the El Paso-Juarez region during the 1700s

Arts & Culture

Women’s rights in the El Paso-Juarez region during the 1700s

by Janet Monteros // August 8, 2013

In 1763 in the El Paso-Juarez region women were filing lawsuits and conducting their business affairs as a matter of course. A review of the records in the archives housed at the University of Texas at El Paso titled “Ciudad Juarez Municipal Archives” reveal a vigorously litigious climate for the El Paso Juarez region. More...

Defending the history and culture of Ciudad Juarez

Arts & Culture

Defending the history and culture of Ciudad Juarez

by Kent Paterson, Frontera NorteSur // August 8, 2013

In the crisis-ridden rubble of downtown Ciudad Juarez, a group of citizens is arising to restore the cultural vitality and legacy of the Mexican border city. Called Juaritos de mis Recuerdos, or Juarez of My Memories, the year-old organization staged a demonstration August 4 in front of one of the historic buildings it proposes to rescue: the long-closed and decaying Victoria Theater on September 16 Avenue. More...

Was Simeon Hart El Paso’s First Blogger?

Arts & Culture

Was Simeon Hart El Paso’s First Blogger?

by Mark Cioc-Ortega // August 1, 2013

Only one issue of El Paso’s first mass-print newspaper, the "El Paso Sentinel," has survived. It’s dated November 8, 1873 and it’s a real eye-popper. Objective journalism it is not. It reads more like a blog. More...

Local filmmakers featured at El Paso Community Foundation's Plaza Classic Film Festival

Arts & Culture

Local filmmakers featured at El Paso Community Foundation's Plaza Classic Film Festival

by Andrés Rodríguez, Scripps Howard Foundation Wire // July 18, 2013

The Local Flavor series began with cooperation between Ep Film’s showcase— The Good, The Bad, The Indie—and the Plaza Classic Film Festival in 2008, Carlos Corral, the festival’s local film coordinator, said. “We were getting a lot more shorts. We were getting a lot of more works submitted. So, then we started to kind of expand a little bit,” he said of the early years of the series. More...

What’s in a name? An homage to the original Newspaper Tree

Arts & Culture

What’s in a name? An homage to the original Newspaper Tree

by Mark Cioc-Ortega // July 4, 2013

"Newspaper Tree" is named in honor of El Paso’s first news source: a large ash tree that once stood on the southeast corner of Pioneer Plaza. Nobody knows when the tree took root, but it matured on the banks of the El Paso acequia during the 1840s, when the Southwest still belonged to Mexico and the future downtown was known as Ponce’s Ranch. The tree served as the main bulletin board for El Paso residents during the 1850s and 1860s, after the U.S.-Mexican War (1846-1848) put Ponce’s Ranch on the American side of the border. It was called “the newspaper tree,” “the news tree,” the “notice tree,” or simply “the tree.” More...